explore-blog:

For a moment of sheer cosmic and earthly awe: This might look like a surrealist painting, but it’s a 270-image composite taken over two hours in Indonesia, including the erupting Mount Semeru, star trails in the sky, and a meteor streaking across on the right. 
With a sight like this, how is one not to contemplate our longing for permanence and agree with Carl Sagan that nature is the greatest source of spirituality?

explore-blog:

For a moment of sheer cosmic and earthly awe: This might look like a surrealist painting, but it’s a 270-image composite taken over two hours in Indonesia, including the erupting Mount Semeru, star trails in the sky, and a meteor streaking across on the right. 

With a sight like this, how is one not to contemplate our longing for permanence and agree with Carl Sagan that nature is the greatest source of spirituality?

284 notes

morningamp:

Mother Jones senior editor, Dave Gilson, joined the Morning AMp hosts Brian Babylon and Molly Adams to discuss a story he published last month about the life of Roert Dowlut, general consul for the the NRA. Dowlut was convicted of murder in South Bend, IN in 1964 but was released 6 years later after an appeal and Supreme Court decisions had his case overturned due to police missteps including denying him the right to see a lawyer. Gilson tells us the tale and about the fallout from his reporting. Take a listen!

6 notes

theweekmagazine:

How a Palestinian turned airstrikes into art

A young artist chooses to see hope amid the ongoing crisis between Gaza and Israel

(via salon)

552 notes

guardian:

Evacuation orders have been sent to some 13,000 phone numbers as an out-of-control wildfire bears down on a community near Yosemite National Park in central California.
Air tankers and helicopters have been used to tackle the blaze, which is burning near a propane business with 30,000 gallon tanks on the site. 
• Read the full story here
Photo: Eric Paul Zamora/AP

guardian:

Evacuation orders have been sent to some 13,000 phone numbers as an out-of-control wildfire bears down on a community near Yosemite National Park in central California.

Air tankers and helicopters have been used to tackle the blaze, which is burning near a propane business with 30,000 gallon tanks on the site. 

Read the full story here

Photo: Eric Paul Zamora/AP

(Source: theguardian.com)

273 notes

aljazeeraamerica:

AJAM’s Nick Schifrin has been reporting the Gaza conflict on the ground for the past month. Here’s a selection of what he’s been seeing. Follow him on Twitter @NickSchifrin for real-time updates.

147 notes

ajtechknow:

Meet 18-year-old Petra Grutzik, whose award-winning research with UCLA neuroscientists is just the beginning.

Grutzik is from Manhattan Beach, Calif., and recently was recognized at the 2014 intel International Science and Engineering Fair for her research on a protein called FOXP2 and its link to speech disorders.

FOXP2 is found in both human brains and songbird brains. Songbirds learn to sing through social interaction the way humans learn to talk, and FOXP2 is expressed similarly in both.

With the help of mentor professors from uclaneuroscience, Grutzik conducted research over two years to determine how various levels of this protein affects the quality of communication through speech. 

“When a baby is first born, they cry,” Grutzik explains. “Finches learn how to sing, like we learn how to talk. FOXP2 is involved in speech development in humans and in songbirds. Scientists study FOXP2 in songbirds so they can learn more about it in humans.”

“It is the only single gene that, when mutated, results in a human speech and language disorder,” says UCLA’s Dr. Stephanie White.

“We have excellent undergrads at UCLA,” says Dr. Nancy Day, Grutzik’s mentor at UCLA. “But there’s something special about Petra. We saw it as an excellent opportunity to embrace this eager young woman so that we could not only challenge her but she could challenge us. Petra has infused an energy into the lab that we didn’t have before.”

Grutzik also tapped into her background in robotics to design and build a cage for the finches that was long enough and had two separate chambers in which she could conduct her testing on the birds.  

Read more at our site and watch aljazeeraamerica on Saturday 7:30PM ET/4:30PM PT. 

1,963 notes

This is how alcohol looks under the microscope:

ajtechknow:

psychedelic-psychiatrist:

A company called Bevshots has produced a series of shots of booze under the microscope at the Florida State University’s chemistry labs.

Molecules at 1000x Magnification

Champagne:

image

Dry Martini:

image

Margarita:

image

Pina Colada:

image

Sake:

image

Scotch:

image

Tequila:

image

Vodka:

image

This is insanely cool, especially because we just remembered that this week’s TechKnow—a repeat of one of our favorite episodes—includes our first (and so far only) signature cocktail: bourbon poured over glacial ice

(Source: telegraph.co.uk)

318,983 notes

jessieloux:

Stylesight’s image library is the perfect source for inspiration and in this case we’ve got Triya’s beautiful S/S 13 swimwear collection.

I’m so in love with the pieces I have posted above and I cannot wait to see these colours, prints and cuts take over the high street next summer.

Look out for bright, vibrant colour schemes, tribal inspired designs, oversized and exhaggerated accessories, metallic tones and eye-catching cuts and shapes next summer.

(Source: stylesight.com, via thepandabaker)

84 notes

ajtechknow:

For this week’s episode of “TechKnow,” we sent our scientist/contributor philtorres to the Bahamas for five days. Nice work if you can get it, right? 

Then he had to straddle a 1-ton tiger shark so a team of scientists could determine if she was pregnant. That was a little harder.

From Phil’s journal in the field

“How do you conserve sharks?”

I asked this to Dr. Neil Hammershlag as we were loading up the gear onto the Shear Water, a shark diving vessel that would be our rocking home for the next five days. 

He gave me a smirking, oh-you’ll-see look and replied, “We need to get to know sharks better.” Neil is the head of the RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation program at University of Miami, and he let us tag along on his shark research expedition to Tiger Beach with a team he hand picked.

As researchers like Neil learn more about sharks, they can use that knowledge to educate the public and inform policy makers all in an effort to cut down on the estimated 100 million sharks that are killed by humans every year.

Seems like a simple enough plan, but how do you get to know sharks? They are elusive, mysterious giants of the oceans that can be very hard to find in the vast ocean, and that’s where the controlled chaos of straddling-a-shark-to-study-it comes in.

Read more from Phil about getting a nasty case of “shark burn,” working with a diverse team of men and women—undergrads to professors—and how he caught shark conservation fever.

Then watch “TechKnow” on Saturday at 7:30PM ET/4:30PM PT on aljazeeraamerica to see one of the most beautiful—and biggest adrenaline rush—episodes we’ve made to date.

14 notes

liftedandgiftedd:

yo dude in the back hellllaaa reached out like it was nothing to grab that shit

liftedandgiftedd:

yo dude in the back hellllaaa reached out like it was nothing to grab that shit

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via thepandabaker)

230,824 notes

ajtechknow:

Last month, a Los Angeles TV anchorman soared into viral heaven when his morning newscast was interrupted by a smaller, 4.4 quake.

By comparison, look how Mexican TV covered the 7.2 quake that struck off the coast of Acapulco on April 18, 2014. The anchorman comes on nearly 30 seconds before the quake strikes, giving him plenty of time to warn of the impending danger. You can see him react relatively calmly when the quake finally hits.

That’s because Mexico has had an early warning system since the devastating 1985 quake that killed more than 9,000 people.

So why don’t we have one in California yet? 

The warning system is up and running—but it’s only a small, prototype and therefore not available for the public. It’s all about money and politics. Apparently to build a proper warning system would require some $80 million in funding, something the California legislature has not yet been willing to approve.

Even 30 seconds’ warning could prove to be lifesaving

Trains could be stopped, planes waved off from landing on potentially ruined runways, elevators sent safely to the nearest floor.

“There’s a good chance someone is going to be right in the middle of a very delicate procedure when an earthquake occurs,” says Kurt Kainsinger, who manages earthquake safety at one LA’s busiest medical centers, UCLA’s Ronald Reagan Hospital. “If we have advanced warning, if we have five seconds, 10 seconds, 30 seconds warning—there’s a lot we can do.”

For more about earthquake early warning systems, and when we might get them in the U.S., watch "TechKnow" on aljazeeraamerica this Saturday night at 7:30PM ET/4:30PM PT.

313 notes

reuters:

Scientists warn global warming is now “irreversibly” melting glaciers in Antarctica, leading to centuries of rising sea levels. See more photos: http://reut.rs/1sKsHhL

493 notes

ajtechknow:

"TechKnow" Signature Cocktail On the Rocks

1. Travel to NASA’s remote research station in Greenland.

2. Endure heavy turbulence in a Cold War-era propeller plane to map glaciers in the Arctic Sea.

3. Fix yourself a drink: 

  • Alcohol (whatever’s handy)
  • Ice cubes, glacial (containing water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, CFCs)

4. Shhh. Listen to the sound of tiny air bubbles that have been trapped in ice for thousands of years as they sizzle in your drink. “It’s the glaciers speaking to us,” says senior scientist John Sonntag (left, bottom photo).

5. Tune into “TechKnow” this Saturday night for more.

52 notes

cresis:

Photo courtesy of James Yungel.

Al Jazeera America will feature NASA’s Operation IceBridge on their TechKnow segment this Saturday at 7:30 EST. Operation IceBridge is an annual mission to measure changes in the thickness of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica.
Check for air times here.

cresis:

Photo courtesy of James Yungel.

Al Jazeera America will feature NASA’s Operation IceBridge on their TechKnow segment this Saturday at 7:30 EST. Operation IceBridge is an annual mission to measure changes in the thickness of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica.

Check for air times here.

9 notes

ajtechknow:

In this week’s TechKnow, we see how scientists are splicing spider DNA into goats to see if it’s possible to mass-produce super-strong, medical-grade silk strands.
Don’t worry: "They’re not shooting webs from their wrists," said Randy Lewis of Utah State University. “They don’t have eight legs.”
But it’s worth noting Lewis’ lab had Spider-Man action figures scattered around, and when we asked another researcher there if Spider-Man could truly stop a train or drop from a building using only his web, Cameron Copeland said, “Technically, yes—but Spider-Man could never make enough silk to pull it off.”

ajtechknow:

In this week’s TechKnow, we see how scientists are splicing spider DNA into goats to see if it’s possible to mass-produce super-strong, medical-grade silk strands.

Don’t worry: "They’re not shooting webs from their wrists," said Randy Lewis of Utah State University. “They don’t have eight legs.”

But it’s worth noting Lewis’ lab had Spider-Man action figures scattered around, and when we asked another researcher there if Spider-Man could truly stop a train or drop from a building using only his web, Cameron Copeland said, “Technically, yes—but Spider-Man could never make enough silk to pull it off.”

18 notes