jessieloux:

Stylesight’s image library is the perfect source for inspiration and in this case we’ve got Triya’s beautiful S/S 13 swimwear collection.

I’m so in love with the pieces I have posted above and I cannot wait to see these colours, prints and cuts take over the high street next summer.

Look out for bright, vibrant colour schemes, tribal inspired designs, oversized and exhaggerated accessories, metallic tones and eye-catching cuts and shapes next summer.

(Source: stylesight.com, via thepandabaker)

84 notes

ajtechknow:

For this week’s episode of “TechKnow,” we sent our scientist/contributor philtorres to the Bahamas for five days. Nice work if you can get it, right? 

Then he had to straddle a 1-ton tiger shark so a team of scientists could determine if she was pregnant. That was a little harder.

From Phil’s journal in the field

“How do you conserve sharks?”

I asked this to Dr. Neil Hammershlag as we were loading up the gear onto the Shear Water, a shark diving vessel that would be our rocking home for the next five days. 

He gave me a smirking, oh-you’ll-see look and replied, “We need to get to know sharks better.” Neil is the head of the RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation program at University of Miami, and he let us tag along on his shark research expedition to Tiger Beach with a team he hand picked.

As researchers like Neil learn more about sharks, they can use that knowledge to educate the public and inform policy makers all in an effort to cut down on the estimated 100 million sharks that are killed by humans every year.

Seems like a simple enough plan, but how do you get to know sharks? They are elusive, mysterious giants of the oceans that can be very hard to find in the vast ocean, and that’s where the controlled chaos of straddling-a-shark-to-study-it comes in.

Read more from Phil about getting a nasty case of “shark burn,” working with a diverse team of men and women—undergrads to professors—and how he caught shark conservation fever.

Then watch “TechKnow” on Saturday at 7:30PM ET/4:30PM PT on aljazeeraamerica to see one of the most beautiful—and biggest adrenaline rush—episodes we’ve made to date.

14 notes

liftedandgiftedd:

yo dude in the back hellllaaa reached out like it was nothing to grab that shit

liftedandgiftedd:

yo dude in the back hellllaaa reached out like it was nothing to grab that shit

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via thepandabaker)

229,736 notes

ajtechknow:

Last month, a Los Angeles TV anchorman soared into viral heaven when his morning newscast was interrupted by a smaller, 4.4 quake.

By comparison, look how Mexican TV covered the 7.2 quake that struck off the coast of Acapulco on April 18, 2014. The anchorman comes on nearly 30 seconds before the quake strikes, giving him plenty of time to warn of the impending danger. You can see him react relatively calmly when the quake finally hits.

That’s because Mexico has had an early warning system since the devastating 1985 quake that killed more than 9,000 people.

So why don’t we have one in California yet? 

The warning system is up and running—but it’s only a small, prototype and therefore not available for the public. It’s all about money and politics. Apparently to build a proper warning system would require some $80 million in funding, something the California legislature has not yet been willing to approve.

Even 30 seconds’ warning could prove to be lifesaving

Trains could be stopped, planes waved off from landing on potentially ruined runways, elevators sent safely to the nearest floor.

“There’s a good chance someone is going to be right in the middle of a very delicate procedure when an earthquake occurs,” says Kurt Kainsinger, who manages earthquake safety at one LA’s busiest medical centers, UCLA’s Ronald Reagan Hospital. “If we have advanced warning, if we have five seconds, 10 seconds, 30 seconds warning—there’s a lot we can do.”

For more about earthquake early warning systems, and when we might get them in the U.S., watch "TechKnow" on aljazeeraamerica this Saturday night at 7:30PM ET/4:30PM PT.

308 notes

reuters:

Scientists warn global warming is now “irreversibly” melting glaciers in Antarctica, leading to centuries of rising sea levels. See more photos: http://reut.rs/1sKsHhL

488 notes

ajtechknow:

"TechKnow" Signature Cocktail On the Rocks

1. Travel to NASA’s remote research station in Greenland.

2. Endure heavy turbulence in a Cold War-era propeller plane to map glaciers in the Arctic Sea.

3. Fix yourself a drink: 

  • Alcohol (whatever’s handy)
  • Ice cubes, glacial (containing water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, CFCs)

4. Shhh. Listen to the sound of tiny air bubbles that have been trapped in ice for thousands of years as they sizzle in your drink. “It’s the glaciers speaking to us,” says senior scientist John Sonntag (left, bottom photo).

5. Tune into “TechKnow” this Saturday night for more.

52 notes

cresis:

Photo courtesy of James Yungel.

Al Jazeera America will feature NASA’s Operation IceBridge on their TechKnow segment this Saturday at 7:30 EST. Operation IceBridge is an annual mission to measure changes in the thickness of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica.
Check for air times here.

cresis:

Photo courtesy of James Yungel.

Al Jazeera America will feature NASA’s Operation IceBridge on their TechKnow segment this Saturday at 7:30 EST. Operation IceBridge is an annual mission to measure changes in the thickness of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica.

Check for air times here.

9 notes

ajtechknow:

In this week’s TechKnow, we see how scientists are splicing spider DNA into goats to see if it’s possible to mass-produce super-strong, medical-grade silk strands.
Don’t worry: "They’re not shooting webs from their wrists," said Randy Lewis of Utah State University. “They don’t have eight legs.”
But it’s worth noting Lewis’ lab had Spider-Man action figures scattered around, and when we asked another researcher there if Spider-Man could truly stop a train or drop from a building using only his web, Cameron Copeland said, “Technically, yes—but Spider-Man could never make enough silk to pull it off.”

ajtechknow:

In this week’s TechKnow, we see how scientists are splicing spider DNA into goats to see if it’s possible to mass-produce super-strong, medical-grade silk strands.

Don’t worry: "They’re not shooting webs from their wrists," said Randy Lewis of Utah State University. “They don’t have eight legs.”

But it’s worth noting Lewis’ lab had Spider-Man action figures scattered around, and when we asked another researcher there if Spider-Man could truly stop a train or drop from a building using only his web, Cameron Copeland said, “Technically, yes—but Spider-Man could never make enough silk to pull it off.”

18 notes

(via darksideoftheshroom)

2,106 notes

fastcompany:

Beautifully Pristine Relics Of Technologies Past

Technology advances rapidly, with our computers and cell phones becoming outdated practically the moment we start using them. Something newer, faster, better is already on sale, making a cell phone from a decade ago look positively alien. There’s a sentimental pull that emanates from the obsolete hunks of electronics that once served as cutting edge visions of the future and Portland-based photographer Jim Golden harnesses that nostalgia in his new photography series “Relics of Technology.”

Read More>

(via onaissues)

443 notes

larrycarlson:

#LarryCarlson

larrycarlson:

#LarryCarlson

43 notes

(Source: beradiantlyraw, via foulmouthedliberty)

111,493 notes

(Source: stupid-young, via evolvernet)

6,707 notes

devidsketchbook:

Castle On A Grain Of Sand

Artist Vik Muniz and artist/researcher Marcelo Coelho collaborate to place a drawing onto a single piece of sand, less than a single millimeter wide, and took four years to complete - video embedded below:

After four years of experimentation, Photographer Vik Muniz and designer Marcelo Coelho successfully created microscopic drawings of castles on single grains of sand. Take an in-depth look into the advanced and archaic processes and inspirations behind these revolutionary micro-masterpieces.

You can find out more at the Creators Project here

[ via: prostheticknowledge ]

(via devidsketchbook)

1,101 notes

ajtechknow:

mothernaturenetwork:

Switching fonts could save the U.S. government millions — and it could save you some cash, tooA middle-school student discovers that printing documents in a certain font can reduce ink consumption by an astonishing amount.

A 14-year-old is trying to save the US government $136 million a year just by rethinking how they use established technology in a really basic way. What did you do today? 

ajtechknow:

mothernaturenetwork:

Switching fonts could save the U.S. government millions — and it could save you some cash, too
A middle-school student discovers that printing documents in a certain font can reduce ink consumption by an astonishing amount.

A 14-year-old is trying to save the US government $136 million a year just by rethinking how they use established technology in a really basic way. What did you do today? 

436 notes